I Love a Bit of Crumpet!

crumpet

A few days ago we hosted a little afternoon tea, nothing exciting in that I hear you say, maybe some simple tea cakes or scones and jam, even a sandwich or two but you would be wrong, what we served brought back memories of something very special because more years ago than I would care to admit, (ok, 30 to be precise) we launched into our first food business, a partnership between my brother Jeremy, my wife Jo-Ann and I.

We set about creating a very unique little tea rooms in one of Adelaide’s leafier suburbs called Thomas & Drury. Looking back it was all very Downton Abbey though at the time we aspired it to be more Fortnum & Mason. The backbone of our offering was a terribly British range of cakes and pastries, the recipes for which had been handed down from our business’s  namesake, our great aunt (Phyllis Thomas) and our grandmother (Kathleen Drury). Both of these redoubtable ladies had worked “below stairs” in private houses of Edwardian Britain and looking back, clearly they greatly influenced how we saw food.

T&D (2)

Their recipes were for the type of baked goods that you only normally see done well in a “home” setting. They included a very time consuming Battenberg , a rich Dundee cake, miniature éclairs, featherlight Madeira cake, yeasted pikelets, Cornish splits, shortbread tails, Sally Lunns (a kind of English brioche) and very much to the point of today’s blog, homemade crumpets.

In keeping with the whole theme, we brought into Adelaide a range of single origin teas and coffees from a small independent importer in Sydney, which we blended and packed to order (no Twinnings or Robert Timms for us, which was the norm back then), and of course these were all served from, and into, fine Wedgewood and Royal Doulton bone china (we almost needed a separate mortgage just for the breakages). If that wasn’t enough we also manufactured a range of some 15 or so condiments, sauces and relishes.

shop (2)

But the centre piece of the business was our afternoon tea, served on very elegant tiered, china cake stands and loaded with all kinds of tea time goodies. It was a decent spread, sweet and savory, hot and cold, all freshly made and all very, very proper. Suffice to say it was a bold venture, some would have called it ambitious but today tea boutiques and ethical barista coffee are common place, the great British/Aussie bakeoff and other cooking shows regularly feature many of the classic sweet things that were our stock in trade and fine bone china is  again quite fashionable now, clearly in terms of being “on trend” we were well ahead of the what was to come.

tea (2)

But back to the crumpets, and with a few exceptions during my time at Appellation, I have hardly had cause to make a crumpet in the past 28 years, but for this event it seemed to be the perfect time to revisit the past and so we decided to serve real English style currant muffins, hot off the griddle (not those obese cup cakes Americans call muffins ), a rich, moist bitter chocolate cake with rum fondant icing, flaky, little savoury pies of local ham, cheese and potatoes, a silky smooth potted mushroom pate and of course home made crumpets, all washed down with Barossa Sparkling Shiraz rather than Darjeeling …. My how times have changed and welcome to the Barossa!.

sparkling shiraz (3)

For those that have never tried making crumpets from scratch, they really are very simple (if you can make pancakes you can make crumpets!) and believe me it is worth it. They really are so different from the supermarket variety that have been sitting quietly sweating in their plastic wrappings for lord knows how long.

Firstly, they are much, much lighter, of course they are still full of those little holes designed to soak up all that butter, but they lack the stodginess of the shop bought item. Secondly, and really importantly when you toast them they actually get crisp on the outside, yet staying soft and moist in the center. And thirdly, they are all natural, lacking the long life additives, chemicals (and weird sourness) that plague the shop bought item.

Try them next weekend when you have a little more spare time, the batter will take a couple of hours to be ready to cook, but the great thing is they can (and should) be made ahead, sure you can eat them straight off the grill but the second cooking or toasting actually improves the eating quality. And most importantly, please don’t stint on the butter and never, ever, under any circumstances use margarine, that’s just plain wrong!

Crumpets

250g                                       plain flour
pinch                                     salt
15g                                         dried yeast
350ml                                    milk – blood temperature
1                                              egg
1 teaspoon                            caster sugar

Melted butter for grilling

Method

  • Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl (except butter) and mix well to a smooth batter.
  • Cover bowl with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature to “prove” for 1-2 hours
  • When proved, batter should be thick and foamy (see image)

batter2

  • Preheat a non stick pan or griddle over a low heat, grease some egg rings or metal cookie cutters well with non stick spray or melted butter.
  • Brush or wipe pan lightly with melted butter and place spoonfuls of batter into rings to about the depth of 7mm

in rings 2

  • Cook until crumpet clearly forms holes on top and base is a nice golden colour.
  • Remove ring and turn crumpet over and cook until lightly golden

on griddle2

  • Transfer to a cooling rack and reheat in a toaster when ready to eat and butter generously!

ready to toast2

Its Marvelous What A Difference Milo Makes!

H served

Choosing a dessert to serve to a group can be a difficult thing, especially for a group of family and friends with wildly divergent tastes. Some people love them, others claim not to but will still devour them, while others, self included, prefer cheese or something savoury. But there are so many options, from extravagant to simple, piping hot or frozen solid, light to rich and everything in between, so what constitutes a great pudding?

The growth of dessert bars and restaurants employing “molecular” techniques seems to have made desserts increasingly complex, deconstructed into multiple elements to keep up with food fashion and trends. Of course the best of these “new desserts” in the hands of master pastry chefs can be sublime or ethereal, but all too often they are simply copy cat versions of someone else’s creations, poorly executed and clumsy at best.

Even at the highest levels though, these “new creations” never seem to provoke the response one gets from home spun or comfort desserts. Maybe it’s the familiarity factor, or just plain old, uncomplicated deliciousness with no need for intellectualization, but with old school “puddings or sweets” people will often ask for extra helpings, in a way that they never will for a deconstructed lemon cheese cake, you know the type of thing:

“Cream cheese foam, Buttered almond granola gravel, Heirloom citrus gel and Popping candy dust”.

Keeping this and simplicity in mind I decided that for our family get together, I should serve a safe old favourite, maybe something as simple as a “rich chocolate tart”. But because our “adult” guest of honour, is an ice-cream addict (especially with Milo if he gets the chance) we decided a twist was in order, and  creating a malty “Milo” tart seemed to be a good idea .

With a little trial and error we arrived at the following recipe, its hardly kids stuff, boasting grown up, comfort flavours and it is still definitely rich, but the filling is lighter featuring a Milo enriched pastry cream rather than a heavy chocolate ganache and is even slightly savoury thanks to a little salt in the mix. Even though it may look complicated it really is quite easy and worth the effort, what’s more, it went down a treat with some old rich Barossa Muscat and home made vanilla ice cream of course!

 

Milo Tart

Pastry Case:

125g Flour
50g sugar
20g cocoa powder
90g butter
½ egg- beaten

Method:

  • Sift flour sugar and cocoa together, rub in butter to a fine crumb and add egg.

2 rubin 2a crumble

  • Using fingertips pull dough together, do not knead, allow to rest for 20 minutes
  • Roll out between two sheets of plastic wrap and transfer into a 25cm flan ring.

3 dough 4 pin out

  • Press firmly into tin, trim edges, prick base all over and place in fridge for 20 minutes
  • Bake at 170c for 7-10 minutes or until crisp. Allow to cool before use (can be made ahead)

 

 

Milo Cream
350ml milk
70g Milo
100g malt extract

6 egg yolks
50g cornflour

50g dark chocolate – 70% cocoa
1 teaspoon Maldon sea salt flakes
20ml Amontillado sherry

250ml cream
50g caster sugar

Extra Milo for serving

Method:

  • Warm milk with milo and malt extract until all is dissolved /incorporated
  • Cream yolks and cornflour together in a mixing bowl
  • Whisk in warm milo and milk mixture until smooth and strain into a saucepan.

B Milk & Milo C cook cream 2

  • Bring gently to a simmer stirring constantly with a spatula to ensure nothing sticks to the base

 

  • As soon as mixture boils, remove from the heat and mix in the chocolate, salt and sherry
  • Beat well until smooth and glossy and allow to cool thoroughly

D cook cream 3 E add chocolate

  • When cool, whisk cream and sugar until thick and fold evenly through the chocolate custard
  • Fill into pre baked tart shell and allow to set for at least 2 hours

F fold cream G tart

  • Dredge top with extra Milo before serving in wedges with vanilla ice cream

Rote Grutze, Groats, Grits or Gruel

This Saturday marks one of the big days on our Barossa calendar, the Annual Tanunda show, held mid-vintage every year, a celebration of this valley that I am proud to call home, and one of the highlights is the hotly contended Rote Grutze championship.

For the uninitiated Rote Grutze is a dish originally from Northern Germany and Scandanavia where it also goes by the names Rodgrod or Rotezetke Gruetze, and is a kind of red fruit jelly, set with starch instead of gelatin or alginates.

Rotegrutze

With “rote” meaning red, “grutze” is related to the English words gruel or groats and even grits, all of which are porridges of cracked or coarsely ground grains like wheat, semolina, oats, barley, buckwheat, and in the Southern States of the USA, corn.

German Master Pastry Chef Christian Teubner describes Rote Grutze as “…. simply fruit juice thickened with cornflour, semolina or sago….” an accurate description, except European versions use fruits like redcurrants and true blackcurrants, but neither of these do too well in our Mediterranean climate.

By contrast, The Barossa’s Rote Grutze uses Grape juice (and there is a big disagreement whether it should be Grenache, Shiraz or Mataro) and while the pioneers that settled our valley may have been familiar the type of dessert Mrs Beeton called “Danish Pudding” (below) no local recipes for our dessert made with grapes exists until around 1920, some 60 years after the valley was settled.

Danish Pudding

However, such is the legendary status of this dish in the Barossa that I hadn’t questioned its origins, and so for the past 20 years, I have repeated the line that this sago and grape jelly, only exists in this form, in one place in the world, our “Barossa”. So imagine my surprise recently when I found out about an almost identical recipe, but originating on the other side of the world some 200 years ago!

Dating to when the Portuguese Royal family “The House of Braganza” fled to their Brazilian colony in the 1800’s to escape Napoleon and what would become known as the Peninsular wars. This dessert was apparently developed through the merging of  a traditional Brazilian tapioca or cassava porridge, but was sweetened with Portuguese grapes, spices and rich dark Port wine. Called “Sagu ao vinho tinto”  this dish is still made today as a regional specialty and is always served with fresh cream, just like Rote Grutze.

sagu ao vinho tinto

sagu ao vinho tinto

In fact our word Sago comes via the 16th century Portuguese Molluccas where the Sagu palm is naturalized, but today most of what is sold as Sago is actually tapioca. Of course, with this pudding hailing from around 1810, it pre-dates the arrival of Germanic settlers into South Australia and the Barossa by at least 25 years, but intriguingly there is another connection to Portugal through Colonel Light and his service in the Peninsula wars, notably the battle of Barrosa.

So did the good burghers and military men of early Adelaide know this Sago dessert from Portuguese connections or is our Rote Grutze just a coincidence, the result of fusion or evolution with Silesian settlers adapting to grape juice and sago instead of the redcurrants and semolina that would have been familiar, even if the local tradition of doctoring Rote Grutze with “Port” for extra flavor makes me wonder.

Anyway, whatever the origin of this recipe, German, Portuguese, Brazilian, or local invention, it’s simple, delicious and well worth making if you can get your hands on some fresh red wine grapes. I’ll leave you to argue about which varieties are best!

 

Rotegrutze

4 tablespoons       Sago / tapioca balls
500ml                    Grape Juice (Mataro preferably)
2 tablespoons       Caster Sugar
½ stick                   Cinnamon
2                               Cloves
1 strip                      Lemon zest

Method

Prepare grape juice by separating grapes from stems and place in a saucepan with a little water, cover pan and bring to a simmer,turn off heat and allow grapes to release their juices.

ready to juice

Press grapes to extract as much, juice, colour and flavor as possible and strain to produce clean juice, you will need about 1.5 – 2kg of grapes to yield 500g juice.

juice#1stems and seeds

Bring grape juice, sugar and spices to a simmer and leave to infuse off of heat for 20 minute and to dissolve sugar.

spiced juice

Strain off spices, stir in sago and bring back to a simmer stirring well to avoid clumping

starch ready to cook

Continue to simmer gently until sago is clear, about 20 minutes then allow to cool slightly and pour into serving dishes.

Rotegrutze

Chill for a few hours or overnight and enjoy it simply with fresh Jersey cream….. Delicious!

Delicious Nightshades

After last week’s plague of zucchini, it could only be a tomato tsunami this week. On a serious note it would be nice if things ripened evenly because it certainly looks like we’re due an eggplant glut in the next couple of weeks, ratatouille in installments anyone? Of course this is the joy of home gardening, but also why we love our farmers markets like our one here in the Barossa, (arguably one of Australia’s best), simply because different gardens have different things at different times.

toamtoes

Anyway this time, unlike my ponderings over zucchini, there really is no question what to make. Forget passata and relish, there will definitely be no bothering with “dead horse”, no for me there is only one thing to do with an abundance of sweet ripe tomatoes and that is make chutney.

ginger

However this is not your typical “Anglo” grandma chutney, spiced up with curry powder and a hadful of raisins. No, my recipe of choice is for an authentic Bengali “Tamator Chaatney”. Certainly there are elements of curry in the ingredients with ginger, chili, fenugreek and other whole “curry spices” but this is really so much about the tomatoes, so rich and bright red, with crunchy shreds of ginger and a beautiful spicy, sweet, sour balance.

spices

There’s nothing complicated in the prep either, the only technical part is slicing the ginger into fine matchsticks or if you’re into fancy terminology “Julienne”, but even that’s easy this time of year because tender, paper skinned, juicy young ginger from Queensland is in peak supply right now.

panch phoran

Essentially to make this, the simplest of chutneys, the spices including the “Panch Phoron” (a blend of five whole seeds, keep an eye on our website for the release of this and other Food Luddite spice blends in the coming weeks) are simply fried, the tomatoes and seasonings are added and the whole is simmered until rich. Lastly coriander leaves and lime juice are added and its ready for immediate use. However, with a layer of oil on top it will last for weeks in the fridge, but I doubt you can keep it that long, because it goes with just about everything!

 

Bengali Tamator Chaatney

120ml                                  vegetable oil
2 teaspoons                        panch phoron
4                                         green chillies – chopped
4                                         cloves garlic  – chopped
5 cm piece                          fresh ginger – shredded into fine matchsticks
1kg                                     ripe tomatoes – diced in approx. 1cm cubes
2 teaspoons                       salt
1/2 cup                               sugar
50ml                                   white vinegar
2                                         limes – juice of
2 tablespoons                    coriander leaf – shredded

Method

  •  Fry panch phoron in hot oil, add garlic, chilli and ginger and fry gently for 2-3 minutes
  • Add Tomatoes, salt, sugar and vinegar and simmer until well reduced and oil starts to separate at the edges of the pan.
  • Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly, stir through the lime juice and fresh coriander to finish
  • Seal in sterilized jars or store in the fridge in a sealable container with a little extra oil floated on top.

My Friend (&) the Chocolate Cake

plated

Medical science over the last 20 years has praised the heart health benefits of dark chocolate, olive oil and red wine, all in moderation of course. S0 I would think that a cake containing all three of these could, or should be labeled a super food, along with chia seeds, quinoa and kale.

And the good news is such a recipe does exist. A few weeks ago, courtesy of a visitor to our Kitchen Studio, I discovered a chocolate cake recipe that includes all three, and well, living in a region where two of these ingredients are locally produced, in excellent supply and of outstanding quality, I figured it would be worth giving it a crack for a lunch we were hosting later that day.

I had to fiddle with the recipe, firstly it was designed to yield a massive cake so that needed adjustment and because it was originally Spanish there were some subtle ingredient changes required, but nothing drastic. Preparing it turned out to be as simple as making a packet mix, and after a slow bake for about 25 mins, it came out of the oven as a dense, moist sponge, all rich and chocolaty, even slightly boozy with a whiff of fresh baked bread.

liquid

Most of the cake was quickly demolished during lunch but the left over’s were packed up and sent home with our co host for his family. Clearly it was a hit because very shortly after I had a call asking if I’d share the recipe? The answer was of course yes, after all,  in one way or another, sharing recipes is pretty much what I do these days.

Diligently I typed up the recipe from my rough notes and edited calculations, promptly flicking them off, quite pleased with myself that this unusual cake not only worked so well, but had proved so popular. However, reality burst my bubble when my friend called the next day to say what she made came nowhere near the cake I had sent over. Of course I ran the recipe again to test why it failed so and it soon became apparent something was very wrong.

dry

The result was a chewy, soapy mass of gloop (my friend was much kinder with her description)  and this threw up some big red flags. It was very clear that I had transcribed the recipe incorrectly because it was way too sugary which accounted for the chewy toffee like character, it had too much raising agent which was clearly responsible for that soapy, chemical trace. So back to my original jottings and on further investigation I discovered that I had listed twice as many dry ingredients (the original quantity) to wet (my modified recipe) Getting measurements like this wrong when transcribing a recipe is  something for which many of my chefs in the past have felt my wrath ….. whoops!

batter

So, egg on my face and a big lesson learnt, never give out a recipe before testing it personally from the final edited version!. But I’m happy to say all is well now, and here is the correct recipe, exactingly tried and tested as evidenced by the photos above and below. To paraphrase the title of a song by Melbourne band My Friend the Chocolate Cake “I’ve got another recipe (and this time it’ll work)”

cake

Ruby Red Wine Chocolate Cake

¾ cup                   plain flour
2 tablespoons      corn flour
½ cup                   cocoa
½ teaspoon         baking powder
1 teaspoon           bi-carb soda
½ teaspoon         fine salt

1 cup                     caster sugar
1                             egg
25g                        yogurt
100ml                   milk
½ cup                  red wine
¼ cup                  olive oil
1 teaspoon          vanilla paste

Method

  • Sift flour, cocoa, raising agents and salt together and add to caster sugar, mix well
  • Combine all wet ingredients in a vitamiser or with a stick blender
  • Add liquid to dry ingredients and mix vigorously with hand beaters or a whisk for 60 seconds, mixture will be quite thin and pourable and will form its own level.
  • Pour into a prepared 16cm spring form or sandwich pan and bake at 170c for 20 minutes or until it springs back to the touch.
  • Allow to sit for 5 minutes then remove from pan and allow to cool (it helps to keep the cake flat for decorating and finishing if you invert the sponge while cooling so that the top is on a flat surface)
  • To serve, simply dust with icing sugar and serve with fresh berries and Jersey cream or sandwich with apricot or raspberry jam.

baked

Keeping Your Cool..

frappe4

To say it’s been hot in the Barossa this past week is an understatement. A sweltering heat wave, horrific bushfires through the Adelaide Hills and a full schedule of cooking classes has kept us busy, inside and at home.

To be honest the biggest question for the week has been “what to drink and cool down with?” It’s really even too hot for wine when you hit this kind of heat, but an answer came in the form of our good friend Geoff Schrapel from Bethany Wines when he dropped off some of his home grown white peaches for us to enjoy.

frappe5

Geoff it must be said grows some of the best fruit in the Barossa Valley. Hailing from one of the oldest settlements in the Barossa, Bethany was originally laid out as a series of “Hufendorfs”, or strip farms back in the 1840’s. These farmlets had space for some orchards and vegetable gardens, room to raise poultry or pigs and to enable a degree of self sufficiency.

Though limited remnants of these small family farms remain, the tradition of growing and sharing the seasons bounty continues amongst the descendants of these Silesian settlers and of course for their fortunate friends. So with the fragrant perfume of these delicate peaches wafting through our kitchen, the decision what to do other than eat them fresh came fairly easily, especially on a day nudging 42°C.

frappe2

The inspiration, an icy cold frappe of white peach sorbet topped up with Sparkling Wine (from Bethany Wines of course!) This is something I’ve served at both Pear Tree Cottage and Appellation in the past and the recipe is truly simplicity itself. What’s more, it doesn’t need any fancy equipment or technique.

frappe 1 frappe3

Most importantly, it was in the freezer in less than half an hour from go to whoa, and a short 3-4 hours later we were enjoying the most refreshing grown up slushy imaginable. More to the point, there’s still plenty in the freezer and more bubbles on ice, time to put the feet up I think…..

Cheers!

 

 

White Peach Sorbet

1                           lemon
160g                    caster sugar
60ml                   water
1 teaspoon         Amaretto
650g                   white peaches – ripe (or enough to yield 500g puree)

Method

    • Using a vegetable peeler cut 4 strips of zest from the lemon making sure you have zest only and no white pith.
    • Place the sugar and water in a small saucepan with the lemon zest and bring to a simmer to dissolve sugar, remove from the heat and allow to cool
    • Squeeze lemon and add juice to the syrup along with the Amaretto – reserve
    • Cut peaches in half, remove stone and if possible peel skin off, blend to a smooth puree, pass through a fine sieve and weigh out 500g puree
    • Add the syrup to the puree and place in a bowl in the freezer compartment of your fridge.
    • Using a whisk, stir every hour until you have a smooth, creamy, sorbet or water ice which can be served as is with fresh fruit or enjoyed on its own

To serve as a frappe, place a good scoop in a tall glass or flute and top up your favourite sparkling beverage, in the photo we’re using Bethany Cuvee Pinot Noir Chardonnay Brut but you can dress it up or down as you please with Champagne, Prosecco, Spumante, Cider , or without alchohol with even a mixture of verjuice and mineral water.